Wednesday, September 20, 2017

India, Japan Expected to Increase Maritime Activity Aimed at China. Patrol SCS. Sell arms to Vietnam, etc. https://t.co/U3dtDwStNN Golez: THE PHILIPPINES SHOULD EXPLOIT THIS THROUGH GOOD DIPLOMACY WITH INDIA AND JAPAN

India, Japan Expected to Increase Maritime Activity Aimed at China. Patrol SCS. Sell arms to Vietnam, etc. https://t.co/U3dtDwStNN
Golez: THE PHILIPPINES SHOULD EXPLOIT THIS THROUGH GOOD DIPLOMACY WITH INDIA AND JAPAN

I quote from article:

1. PATROL SOUTH CHINA SEA, SELL ARMS TO RIVAL STATES LIKE VIETNAM: "India and Japan, anxious to keep Asia’s dominant power Beijing in check, may send patrols into the contested South China Sea or sell arms to rival states following a pair of high-level meetings this month, experts say.

2. INDIA, JAPAN CAN SELL, OR DONATE WEAPONS. THE PHILIPPINES SHOULD EXPLOIT THIS THROUGH GOOD DIPLOMACY WITH INDIA AND JAPAN. "Both Asian countries could sell or donate more weapons to China’s rival maritime claimants, such as Vietnam, so they can build a defense against Beijing. Japan may also use coast guard or naval ships to patrol the sea to show it’s open despite China’s claim to some 90 percent of it.

3. INDIA'S JOINT EXPLORATION WITH VIETNAM. "India will probably continue joint exploration with Vietnam for oil and gas under the 3.5 million-square-kilometer sea, analysts say."

4. “Delhi and Tokyo have both been stepping up their capacity-building efforts in the region, with Japan focused mainly on providing patrol vessels and training for Southeast Asian states and India selling arms to and training the Vietnamese navy,” said Gregory Poling, director of the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative of the American think tank Center for Strategic and International Studies.

India, Japan Expected to Increase Maritime Activity Aimed at China 

  • Ralph Jennings
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, right and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi wave during the ground breaking ceremony for high speed rail project in Ahmadabad, India, Sept. 14, 2017. 
India and Japan, anxious to keep Asia’s dominant power Beijing in check, may send patrols into the contested South China Sea or sell arms to rival states following a pair of high-level meetings this month, experts say.
Both Asian countries could sell or donate more weapons to China’s rival maritime claimants, such as Vietnam, so they can build a defense against Beijing. Japan may also use coast guard or naval ships to patrol the sea to show it’s open despite China’s claim to some 90 percent of it.
India will probably continue joint exploration with Vietnam for oil and gas under the 3.5 million-square-kilometer sea, analysts say.
“Delhi and Tokyo have both been stepping up their capacity-building efforts in the region, with Japan focused mainly on providing patrol vessels and training for Southeast Asian states and India selling arms to and training the Vietnamese navy,” said Gregory Poling, director of the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative of the American think tank Center for Strategic and International Studies.
Two High-Level Talks in a Week
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met counterpart Narendra Modi in India Sept. 13-14 to discuss “enhancing maritime security cooperation,” according to a foreign ministry statement from Tokyo.
On Monday their foreign ministers met at the United Nations with U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to talk about freedom of navigation and respect for international law, the Indian external affairs ministry spokesman said.
Analysts understood both discussions to be aimed at China, including its expansion in the contested sea since 2010.
Neither India nor Japan claims the South China Sea, but the two have warily eyed China’s ascent to being the largest economy and military power in Asia. And despite the meeting with Tillerson in New York, the U.S. government is seen as preoccupied by the militarization of North Korea.
Arms for China’s Smaller South China Sea Claimants
Japan as well as India could sell more weapons to the four Southeast Asian states whose coastal waters overlap China’s claim to the sea, analysts say.
Japan indicated in January it would give Vietnam six patrol boats to help with maritime security. Vietnam has clashed three times since the 1970s with Chinese vessels. In August last year, Japan began giving the Philippines 10 coast guard boats through a soft loan agreement.
India has talked to Vietnam about supplying it BrahMos supersonic cruise missiles, which are co-developed with Russia, among other missiles, leading a state-backed Chinese media outlet earlier this year to accuse India of causing trouble. India in September 2016 offered Vietnam a $500 million line of credit to buy defense hardware, including patrol boats.
Sending Patrol Missions into the Disputed Sea
Japan may test China with low-key patrols of the sea, said Le Hong Hiep, research fellow with the ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore. In May it sent an Izumo helicopter-carrying warship into the sea for port visits in Southeast Asia en route to joint exercises with the United States.
“What they have done is they send a ship to Gulf of Aden and on the way back they do kind of patrol in the South China Sea and do port calls to Vietnam, et cetera,” Le said. “But they do not intentionally design any kind of (freedom of navigation) program in the South China Sea as it may provoke China.
“But in the future I’m not sure, because Japan obviously has some interest in containing China’s ambitions in the South China Sea as well,” he said.
Patrols would show the sea, also packed with fisheries, is open to other countries despite Beijing’s claim of sovereignty to the waterway off its south coast. China has strengthened control and angered rival claimants by using landfill to build artificial islands ready for combat aircraft and radar systems.
Brunei, Malaysia, Taiwan, Vietnam and the Philippines claim all or part of the same sea. 
India and Japan might patrol the sea together with coast guard ships, said Andrew Yang, secretary-general of the Chinese Council of Advanced Policy Studies think tank in Taiwan. They would occasionally send naval vessels, he added.
“Maybe they will increase the momentum of their joint activities in order to demonstrate that Japan and India are closely cooperating in terms of regulating the so-called rule-based behavior in the South China Sea and the region,” Yang said.
India’s Overtures in Southeast Asia
India, as part of a fast-growing trade and investment relationship with Vietnam, can further assert itself in the South China Sea by working with Vietnamese firms on exploration for oil and gas, Le said.
For the past three years, the overseas subsidiary of India’s government-run ONGC has worked with PetroVietnam Exploration Production Corporation to search for oil and gas in the South China Sea. That cooperation helps Vietnam improve its "bargaining power" with China, Le said.
Since losing a world arbitration court verdict over its claim to the South China Sea last year, China has sought favor with Southeast Asian countries through economic aid and investment. Malaysia, Vietnam and the Philippines are accepting China’s overtures -- along with the same from other major nations.
The Philippines, for example, welcomes Japanese aid because the public and the China-friendly government have long trusted Tokyo, said Maria Ela Atienza, political science professor at University of the Philippines Diliman. Filipinos know less about India, she said, but Japan could bridge the gap.
“At least people are not so aware of possible positive relations with India,” Atienza said. “But if it’s an alliance, maybe if Japan can vouch for India, perhaps that can build confidence in terms of the partnership.”

As China’s Wages Rise, Bangladesh Is Newest Stop for Japanese Firms Number of Japanese companies there tripled over past decade. Bloomberg

As China’s Wages Rise, Bangladesh Is Newest Stop for Japanese Firms

Number of Japanese companies there tripled over past decade
From 
As wage hikes in China push away manufacturers, Japanese companies are on the hunt for cheaper production bases elsewhere in Asia. One country where they’re landing is Bangladesh, which offers them the lowest labor costs in the Asia-Pacific region.
The number of Japanese companies with operations in Bangladesh has more than tripled since 2008, reaching 253 as of May 2017, according to the Japan External Trade Organization. That’s still far fewer than the number in China or Thailand, but their presence in Bangladesh is increasing at a much faster pace.
“Bangladesh has been traditionally known as Asia’s poorest country,” said Mari Tanaka, an official at Japan External Trade Organization’s Overseas Research Department. “Labor costs there are lower compared to Japan and other East Asian countries, while it’s possible to hire a large number of young laborers.”
Among workers in 19 countries in Asia Pacific, those in Bangladesh received the lowest average monthly wage from Japanese companies, below their counterparts in Sri Lanka, Laos and Myanmar, according to a Jetro survey
Some firms are establishing a presence in Bangladesh with an eye on its promising domestic market, Jetro says. Major companies such as Honda Motor Co., Rohto Pharmaceutical Co. and Ajinomoto Co. are betting on growth there. With a population of 158 million and a median age of 26.3 years, the country’s gross domestic product has more than doubled over the past five years.
“Larger companies are expanding with the expectation that the domestic market will grow,” Tanaka said.
Uniqlo operator Fast Retailing Co. played a role in Japanese companies starting to move to Bangladesh a decade ago, Tanaka said. Their decision to outsource production there in 2008 triggered a jump in Japanese arrivals, while rising labor costs in China and worsening relations between China and Japan in 2010 and 2012 drove another burst, she said.
Among the 253 companies operating in Bangladesh, about 30 are in the clothing or leather industries, 15 or so are in clothing parts and inspection, 10 in logistics and about 15 in the IT services industry.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

NLEX HARBOR LINK PROJECT (Segments 8.2, 9 & 10). DPWH

NLEX HARBOR LINK PROJECT (Segments 8.2, 9 & 10)

Project Description: 
The project entails the 15.57-km extension of the NLEX from Mindanao Avenue, Quezon City to the C-3 (Circumferential Road 3) in Caloocan City. It is divided into two segments under the concession of the Manila North Tollways Corporation (MNTC) for the Manila North Expressway Project.
A) SEGMENT 8.2 – is a proposed 8.35-kms 4-lane divided expressway from Segment 8.1 at Mindanao Avenue to Republic Avenue turning right to Luzon Avenue up to Commonwealth in Quezon City.
B) SEGMENT 9 - is a 2.42-km. 4-lane (2x2) that connects NLEX Mindanao Avenue Link (Segment 8.1) at the Smart Connect Interchange to McArthur Highway in Valenzuela City.
C) SEGMENT 10 - is a 5.65-km. 4-lanes divided (2x2) elevated expressway connecting McArthur Highway in Valenzuela City and C-3 in Caloocan City. It will utilize the existing PNR railroad tracks that cut across Valenzuela City and Malabon City.
Project Benefits: 
SEGMENT 8.2
  • Reduce travel time from Mindanao Avenue going to Commonwealth Avenue from 45 minutes to 10 minutes.
  • Will benefit 45,000 motorists per day
SEGMENT 10
  • Will decongest Metro Manila by providing access to the NLEX without passing through EDSA or the Balintawak Toll Plaza;
  • Is expected to improve the movement of cargo from the Port of Manila by providing a direct connection between R10 (Radial Road 10) and NLEX; and
  • Is expected to reduce travel time from NLEX Valenzuela to R10 from 23 to 11 minutes via Balintawak-EDSA Monumento, and from 26 to 13 minutes via Balintawak-A. Bonifacio/C3
Project Concessionaire: 
SEGMENT 8.2: 
Manila North Tollways Corp. (MNTC)
SEGMENT 10:
Manila North Tollways Corp. (MNTC)
Implementing Agency:
Toll Regulatory Board (TRB)
Project Cost: 
SEGMENT 8.2
Project Cost:       P 7.45 Billion 
SEGMENT 10
Construction Cost:       P 9.00 Billion
The DPWH evaluated construction cost is P9.004 Billion
Right-of-Way Cost:      P 2.20 Billion
Project Status: 

  • SEGMENT 8.2
  • Detailed Engineering Design (DED) approved by TRB.
  • Approved Parcellary Plans were endorsed to DPWH by TRB for ROW Acquisition.
  • DPWH has organized a ROW Task Force for TRB Projects.
     SEGMENT 9
  • Completed and opened to the public on March 19, 2015.
Project Alignment: 
Project Timeline: 
SEGMENT 8.2
  •  ROW Acquisition is from 2nd Quarter of 2017 to 4th Quarter of 2018
  • Construction Period is from 1st Quarter of 2019 to mid-2021 (Construction may proceed earlier depending on the availability of ROW)
SEGMENT 10
Date Started:                                              May 22, 2014
Target Completion Date:                              June 2018
Total Accomplishment as of Mar 2017:          44.00%

Monday, September 18, 2017

http://langyaw.com/2012/12/15/unisans-vargas-other-heritage-houses/

Unisan’s Vargas & other heritage houses

The beautiful and prominently located Vargas Mansion
The beautiful and prominently located Vargas Mansion
I’ve always looked up at Quezon province’s Bondoc Peninsula as something of an interesting place. It is far, seldom visited and way off the beaten path. Recently, a Facebook friend, Jan Michael Marasigan, invited me for a photo walk and we decided to travel to this peninsula to explore what it has, at a glance.
It was already 9AM when Jan and me arrived in Unisan, our first stop in Quezon’s Bondoc Peninsula, hoping that there will be some interesting architecture, an old church perhaps, a watchtower or cemetery chapel and, of course, heritage houses. With such a short time, we only limit our walks within the town center. 
Interior of the Vargas Mansion with its coffered ceiling. Brown door opens to balcony.
Interior of the Vargas Mansion with its coffered ceiling. Brown door opens to balcony.
After a short breakfast of a small plate of pansit and sinukmani, a type of native rice cake popular in Quezon, and budin, more like cassava cake, we asked around. Alas, there was no old church to photograph but what caught our eye were the old houses lining the streets from corner to corner. 
Interior details: left, section of wall with callado at top and piano; right, grand staircase made from philippine hard wood
Interior details: left, section of wall with callado at top and piano; right, grand staircase made from Philippine hard wood
Unisan’s heritage houses are more or less, turn of the century with no structures built during the Spanish colonial era. There’s no bahay-na-bato but mostly wooden structures, both first and second levels. Many have callado details, some have wrought iron grills while others are clearly early American colonial period. 
The Vargas House along the corner stood out from the rest of the old structures. It’s generally white finished, got interesting callado details, a balcony, massive, perhaps the biggest in the town, and prominently located. The structure was built circa 1907 and one of the oldest. If the friendly owner is around the small store, he can show you the interior.
The three storey former municipal building with an interesting 60s/70s circular building at its side
The three storey former municipal building with an interesting 60s/70s circular building at its side
Interesting detail of ventanilla wrought iron grill
Interesting detail of ventanilla wrought iron grill
Just opposite the Vargas Mansion is the former municipal building. It’s a three story structure with a rather odd third level which is wider than the lower storeys. 
But what really caught my attention was the fantastic wrought iron grills of the ventanilla at the uppermost level just below the large windows. These reminds me of the ones present at the Sunico foundry in San Nicolas, Manila.
Contrasting with the said structure is the attached cylindrical 60s/70s cement building with a beautiful flight of stairs at its side. I was just entranced by the contrast both in color, form and age.
Beautiful wooden house at street corner
Beautiful wooden house at street corner
This is another interesting house directly corner opposite the Vargas Mansion, in terms of form. One thing that I’ve noticed here is that most of the houses don’t use capiz shell windows but square glass panes. Most still have the ventanillas with grills.
Heritage house along the main highway
Heritage house along the main highway
I like this house. Its a seeming bahay-na-bato type but still turn of the century. The posts at the first level gives that impression of elegance and massiveness. 
Two old houses along the highway.
Two old houses along the highway.
Another corner house along the highway with interesting details above the capiz windows. This is one of few structures using these decorative and functional shells. Locals say that it is now abandoned.
Another interesting house near the church
Another interesting house near the church
At first glance, this house just look like the other houses sans the long and extended secondary level roofing. Instead, the windows have their own eaves to, more or less, prevent rainwater from totally entering the second level. But surprise, surprise, the main section above the main entrance stairway is elevated, thus making it unique in the area. 
One of the beautiful houses in the area that fascinated me, located near the church
One of the beautiful houses in the area that fascinated me, located near the church
Lastly, this is one of the very interesting and elegant structure near the church plaza that has just awed me that I took several shots. Its a probably late 20’s house. The first level is made of cement but the second level is something else. It looks massive but at the same time delicate and airy. The wooden grills over the ventanilla is interesting, lines and square shapes that contrasts with the intricate wrought iron flowing design of the grill as shown above.
Unisan may not have the rustic old church but its old fabric is still surely alive and well in the form of its turn of the century and early 20’s/30’s houses that dot the streets. Interestingly, there are still 50s and 60s structures that have rounded corners which add contrast to this town center. 
Travel to the Bondoc Peninsula is conveniently done by bus trip from Manila to Lucena’s Grand Terminal where several minibuses and passenger vans service the different municipalities.

PRESIDENTIAL PROCLAMATION NO. 316 DECLARING THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER AS THE MARITIME AND ARCHIPELAGIC NATION AWARENESS MONTH or MANA MO

PRESIDENTIAL PROCLAMATION  NO. 316 DECLARING THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER AS THE MARITIME AND ARCHIPELAGIC NATION AWARENESS MONTH or MANA MO




India set to replace China as Asia’s growth engine - Japan News PHILIPPINES ALSO EXPECTED TO SURGE DUE TO YOUNG POPULATION

India set to replace China as Asia’s growth engine - Japan News
PHILIPPINES ALSO EXPECTED TO SURGE DUE TO YOUNG POPULATION. https://t.co/4WEwdkXtic

I quote from the article:

1. INDIA'S RISE: "India is poised to emerge as an economic superpower, driven in part by its young population, while China and the Asian Tigers age rapidly, according to Deloitte LLP.

2. PHILIPPINES AND INDONESIA WILL ALSO RISE: "While the looming “Indian summer” will last decades, it isn’t the only Asian economy set to surge. Indonesia and the Philippines also have relatively young populations, suggesting they’ll experience similar growth, says Deloitte.

3. ASIA'S AGING POPULATION: "The number of people aged 65 and over in Asia will climb from 365 million today to more than half a billion in 2027, accounting for 60 percent of that age group globally by 2030, Deloitte said in a report Monday. In contrast, India will drive the third great wave of Asia’s growth — following Japan and China — with a potential workforce set to climb from 885 million to 1.08 billion people in the next 20 years and hold above that for half a century.

4. COUNTRIES WITH BIG AGING PROBLEM: "Deloitte names the countries that face the biggest challenges from the impact of aging on growth as China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand and New Zealand."

4. “India will account for more than half of the increase in Asia’s workforce in the coming decade, but this isn’t just a story of more workers: these new workers will be much better trained and educated than the existing Indian workforce,’’ said Anis Chakravarty, economist at Deloitte India. “There will be rising economic potential coming alongside that, thanks to an increased share of women in the workforce, as well as an increased ability and interest in working for longer. The consequences for businesses are huge.’’



India set to replace China as Asia’s growth engine 

JAPAN NEWS
BloombergSYDNEY (Bloomberg) — India is poised to emerge as an economic superpower, driven in part by its young population, while China and the Asian Tigers age rapidly, according to Deloitte LLP.
The number of people aged 65 and over in Asia will climb from 365 million today to more than half a billion in 2027, accounting for 60 percent of that age group globally by 2030, Deloitte said in a report Monday. In contrast, India will drive the third great wave of Asia’s growth — following Japan and China — with a potential workforce set to climb from 885 million to 1.08 billion people in the next 20 years and hold above that for half a century.
“India will account for more than half of the increase in Asia’s workforce in the coming decade, but this isn’t just a story of more workers: these new workers will be much better trained and educated than the existing Indian workforce,’’ said Anis Chakravarty, economist at Deloitte India. “There will be rising economic potential coming alongside that, thanks to an increased share of women in the workforce, as well as an increased ability and interest in working for longer. The consequences for businesses are huge.’’
While the looming “Indian summer” will last decades, it isn’t the only Asian economy set to surge. Indonesia and the Philippines also have relatively young populations, suggesting they’ll experience similar growth, says Deloitte. But the rise of India isn’t set in stone: if the right frameworks are not in place to sustain and promote growth, the burgeoning population could be faced with unemployment and become ripe for social unrest.
Deloitte names the countries that face the biggest challenges from the impact of aging on growth as China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand and New Zealand. For Australia, the report says the impact will likely outstrip that of Japan, which has already been through decades of the challenges of getting older. But there are some advantages Down Under.
“Rare among rich nations, Australia has a track record of welcoming migrants to our shores,” said Ian Thatcher, deputy managing partner at Deloitte Asia Pacific. “That leaves us less at risk of an aging-related slowdown in the decades ahead.’’Speech